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  • Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
    Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
  • Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
    Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
  • Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
    Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
  • Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
    Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
  • Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes
    Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes

Silver Plated Yemenite Shofar with Jerusalem Lions Crown and Grapes

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An elegant and majestic take on an essential Judaica item for the Rosh Hashana festival celebrations, this beautiful kudu horn Yemenite shofar is adorned by fitted sleeves of silver plating, embossed with religiously and culturally significant imagery: lions, the symbol of the Jewish monarchy; and grapes, one of the Holy Land’s seven produce species.

Process Time (business days): 10
SKU : 17954

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(50% discount)

33% OFF

MSRP: $279.95
Sale price: $189.95

Usher the Jewish new year into your life with this elegant and majestic kudu horn shofar prepared in the style of traditional Yemenite Jewish shofarot.  Its polished, multi-colored surface is further beautified by three embossed sheets of silver plating encasing the horn, depicting imagery that are significant to Judaism and Israel from both a cultural and spiritual point of view. 1) Two lions and a crown - the kingship of Israel stems from the tribe of Judah, whose emblem was a lion.  2) A golden cluster of grapes - one of the shiv’ah minim (seven produce species) of the Holy Land to this day.
The shofar is a special judaica instrument used by Jews during the High Holiday prayer service.  Most notably, it is blown for a total of a hundred blasts, varying from staccato bursts to long, plaintive wails, during the Rosh Hashana morning prayer service.